In the channel
In the channel

Looking back from the regulation basin along the channel of the aqueduct in la vallée de l’Eure, Uzès.

Regulation basin, la vallée de l'Eure
Regulation basin, la vallée de l'Eure

The main channel runs directly from the tunnel. Branching off to the left is the escape channel. Water was regulated by sluice gates dropped in to grooves cut in the stone at the entrace to each channel, visible on the left, just beneath the point where the arch meets the foundation.

In la vallée de l'Eure (looking north)
In la vallée de l'Eure (looking north)

There is little evidence of concretion in the early stages of the aqueduct. The chemical reaction between air and water that crystalized the calcium took about 10 hours. Close to the source, there was insufficient time for the sediment to be deposited.

In la vallée de l'Eure (looking south)
In la vallée de l'Eure (looking south)

At ground level, the channel is dug out of the limestone hillside on the left. On the right, the form of construction shows the dimensions of the channel, 1.2m wide at the base and tall enough for a man to walk through it.

Discovering the tram tracks...
Discovering the tram tracks...

Crossing a farm track near le pont de Bornègre, the line of the aqueduct is marked by a just visible line of cut stone, with the original concrete indicating the inside of the channel to the right. Less visible, but nonetheless present, 1.2m to its right, is the merest outline of concrete to confirm the presence of the channel.

On the Road
On the Road

Leading from Vers-Pont-du-Gard to the quarry from which much of the stone for le pont du Gard was taken. Deeply rutted over time, there is a sense of scale to these things that belies the grandeur of l’aqueduc de Nîmes.

le pont de la Lône
le pont de la Lône

Thrusting into empty space. This photo was taken in January 2018. On a return visit in February 2019, the long section of the fill extending beyond the remnants of the arch support had fallen.

le pont de la Lône
le pont de la Lône

The concretion on the underside of the cut stone arches, gives the structure an almost organic softness.

Calcaire
Calcaire

A large gobbet of concretion sitting under one of the arches of le pont de la Lône.

Turning left
Turning left

Looking back towards Vers. A simple wall on which the channel was built, approaching the now largely absent pont de Font-Ménestière. In the distance are the remnants of a pillar which supported the channel itself.

le pont Roupt
le pont Roupt

Impressive in its scale, le pont Roupt marks the start of the final approach to le pont du Gard.

le pont Roupt 2
le pont Roupt 2

Continuing its march towards le Gardon, showing some of the stonework added to safeguard the remains.

le pont de Valive
le pont de Valive

A well-sited tree having taken root completes the scene.

le pont du Gard, rive gauche
le pont du Gard, rive gauche

The channel sits on top of an imposing structure, 49.4 metres above le Gardon.

le pont du Gard
le pont du Gard

In dramatic winter sun, from the rive droite, looking back to the point of entry of the water into the channel.

le pont du Gard, rive droite
le pont du Gard, rive droite

The channel as it arrives at the end of its crossing of le Gardon.

View from les bois de Remoulins
View from les bois de Remoulins

Having crossed le Gardon, the aqueduct begins a long and serpentine wander through the woods of Remoulin, skirting les garrigues de Nîmes, and entering the most dramatic part of its route.

le pont de Valmale
le pont de Valmale

The first of the bridges supporting the channel in les bois de Remoulins.

Surveying the Scene
Surveying the Scene

Cookie the Aquedog overlooking le pont Valmale - or where it was.

Into the woods
Into the woods

The camera was perfectly vertical - really! The path alongside the acqeduct en route from le pont Valmale to le pont de la combe Roussière.

le pont de la combe Roussière
le pont de la combe Roussière

A dramatic void hints at what was once the largest and most impressive of the bridges in the valleys of les bois de Remoulins.

le pont de la Sartanette
le pont de la Sartanette

The first of the bridges which can be crossed on foot. At its far end it shows clearly the effects of concretion, with the channel eventually reduced to a mere 33cm from an original 1.2m.

le pont de la Sartanette
le pont de la Sartanette

Looking down from the garrigues.

The bridges sit nestled down in the valley, in stark contrast to le pont de la Lône and le pont Roupt, standing as they do on their superstructure, built on level ground. This produces an almost tromp l’oeil effect, playing tricks with the perception of relative elevation. The total drop over 50km remains a mere 12m!

le Ponceau
le Ponceau

Valley four and counting…. A good view of concretion on the right side, where the flow would have been strongest turning into the bridge.

le pont de la combe Joseph.
le pont de la combe Joseph.

While the bridge can only be approached from the valley, there being no viable route following the line of the acqueduct from le Ponceau, it is possible to walk several hundred metres back towards le Ponceau, from where this view opens up.

In the channel
Regulation basin, la vallée de l'Eure
In la vallée de l'Eure (looking north)
In la vallée de l'Eure (looking south)
Discovering the tram tracks...
On the Road
le pont de la Lône
le pont de la Lône
Calcaire
Turning left
le pont Roupt
le pont Roupt 2
le pont de Valive
le pont du Gard, rive gauche
le pont du Gard
le pont du Gard, rive droite
View from les bois de Remoulins
le pont de Valmale
Surveying the Scene
Into the woods
le pont de la combe Roussière
le pont de la Sartanette
le pont de la Sartanette
le Ponceau
le pont de la combe Joseph.
In the channel

Looking back from the regulation basin along the channel of the aqueduct in la vallée de l’Eure, Uzès.

Regulation basin, la vallée de l'Eure

The main channel runs directly from the tunnel. Branching off to the left is the escape channel. Water was regulated by sluice gates dropped in to grooves cut in the stone at the entrace to each channel, visible on the left, just beneath the point where the arch meets the foundation.

In la vallée de l'Eure (looking north)

There is little evidence of concretion in the early stages of the aqueduct. The chemical reaction between air and water that crystalized the calcium took about 10 hours. Close to the source, there was insufficient time for the sediment to be deposited.

In la vallée de l'Eure (looking south)

At ground level, the channel is dug out of the limestone hillside on the left. On the right, the form of construction shows the dimensions of the channel, 1.2m wide at the base and tall enough for a man to walk through it.

Discovering the tram tracks...

Crossing a farm track near le pont de Bornègre, the line of the aqueduct is marked by a just visible line of cut stone, with the original concrete indicating the inside of the channel to the right. Less visible, but nonetheless present, 1.2m to its right, is the merest outline of concrete to confirm the presence of the channel.

On the Road

Leading from Vers-Pont-du-Gard to the quarry from which much of the stone for le pont du Gard was taken. Deeply rutted over time, there is a sense of scale to these things that belies the grandeur of l’aqueduc de Nîmes.

le pont de la Lône

Thrusting into empty space. This photo was taken in January 2018. On a return visit in February 2019, the long section of the fill extending beyond the remnants of the arch support had fallen.

le pont de la Lône

The concretion on the underside of the cut stone arches, gives the structure an almost organic softness.

Calcaire

A large gobbet of concretion sitting under one of the arches of le pont de la Lône.

Turning left

Looking back towards Vers. A simple wall on which the channel was built, approaching the now largely absent pont de Font-Ménestière. In the distance are the remnants of a pillar which supported the channel itself.

le pont Roupt

Impressive in its scale, le pont Roupt marks the start of the final approach to le pont du Gard.

le pont Roupt 2

Continuing its march towards le Gardon, showing some of the stonework added to safeguard the remains.

le pont de Valive

A well-sited tree having taken root completes the scene.

le pont du Gard, rive gauche

The channel sits on top of an imposing structure, 49.4 metres above le Gardon.

le pont du Gard

In dramatic winter sun, from the rive droite, looking back to the point of entry of the water into the channel.

le pont du Gard, rive droite

The channel as it arrives at the end of its crossing of le Gardon.

View from les bois de Remoulins

Having crossed le Gardon, the aqueduct begins a long and serpentine wander through the woods of Remoulin, skirting les garrigues de Nîmes, and entering the most dramatic part of its route.

le pont de Valmale

The first of the bridges supporting the channel in les bois de Remoulins.

Surveying the Scene

Cookie the Aquedog overlooking le pont Valmale - or where it was.

Into the woods

The camera was perfectly vertical - really! The path alongside the acqeduct en route from le pont Valmale to le pont de la combe Roussière.

le pont de la combe Roussière

A dramatic void hints at what was once the largest and most impressive of the bridges in the valleys of les bois de Remoulins.

le pont de la Sartanette

The first of the bridges which can be crossed on foot. At its far end it shows clearly the effects of concretion, with the channel eventually reduced to a mere 33cm from an original 1.2m.

le pont de la Sartanette

Looking down from the garrigues.

The bridges sit nestled down in the valley, in stark contrast to le pont de la Lône and le pont Roupt, standing as they do on their superstructure, built on level ground. This produces an almost tromp l’oeil effect, playing tricks with the perception of relative elevation. The total drop over 50km remains a mere 12m!

le Ponceau

Valley four and counting…. A good view of concretion on the right side, where the flow would have been strongest turning into the bridge.

le pont de la combe Joseph.

While the bridge can only be approached from the valley, there being no viable route following the line of the acqueduct from le Ponceau, it is possible to walk several hundred metres back towards le Ponceau, from where this view opens up.

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